Theresa May to form coalition government

Hauwa Abubakar, UK

U.K Prime Minister Theresa May

Theresa May announced she would be forming a coalition government with the Democratic Unionists Party (DUP) on Friday after her party failed to secure majority seats in the snap election held on Thursday.

Voice of Nigeria reports that the Conservatives secured 318 seats, just eight seats below the needed number to form a parliamentary government.

Theresa May had called a general election in the hopes that the Conservatives would have a landslide victory.

Pre-election independent polls predicted that the Conservatives would have a victorious outing.

However, this turned out awfully wrong as they secured 318 seats out of the 326 needed to win the election.

Coalition

May said a coalition government with Northern Ireland’s DUP would keep her in power, to pursue the Brexit negotiations according to the interests of British people.

“I have just been to see her Majesty the Queen and I will now form a government – A government that can provide certainty, and lead Britain forward at this critical time for our country.

“This government will guide the country through the crucial Brexit talks and deliver on the will of the British people, by taking the United Kingdom out of the European Union,” she said outside Downing Street, just after meeting with the Queen.

However, her stay as PM is uncertain, as some party members have begun to suggest she resigns for calling an election that was not needed after all.

On the opposition side, close competitor, Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn said it was time for May to go.

“If there is a message from tonight’s results, it’s this Prime Minister called the election because she wanted a mandate well, the mandate she’s got is lost conservative seats, lost votes, lost support and lost confidence I would have thought that’s enough to go actually, and make way for a government that will be truly a representative of the people of this country,” he said on Thursday night.

Opposition coalition

Labour also did not secure majority votes with 261 slots but a coalition with other liberal left wing parties is likely to hold.

If that happens, May’s position could be under threat.

Earlier, May had said the country needed to be stable to enter a Brexit negotiation.

“At this time, more than anything else, this country needs a period of stability. As we ran this campaign, we set out to consider the issues that were the key priorities for the British people- getting the Brexit deal right, ensuring that we’ve identified and show how we can address the challenges facing our country, doing what is in the National interest.”

The negotiations to leave the EU are expected to begin in ten days.

DUP, a Northern Ireland party, is yet to confirm a coalition would hold.

The snap election saw a massive turnout of young voters, with total voters turnout placed at 68%.

 

Zainab Sa’id