Trekker of Steven-Johnson Syndrome arrives Lagos

Luqmon Balogun, Lagos

Fadesola-Adedayo-on-Lagos-Ibadan-express-way-walking-in-to-Lagos-and-joined-by-family-and-friends. Photo credit: Luqmon Balogun.

A Nigerian-born civil engineer based in Canada, Fadesola Adedayo, who ran a race to raise one million Dollar toward Steven-Johnson’s Syndrome research, has finally arrived Lagos from Abuja.

The famous trekker was on course to complete a 17-day Abuja to Lagos marathon.

The 25-year-old Adedayo expressed his joy on his completion of the race, as he was received by some members of the public at the foremost Freedom Park in Lagos.

The race began on May 13 in Abuja after the flag-off by the Health Minister, Professor Isaac Adewole and flag-down in Lagos by a member of the Health Service Committee of the Nigeria’s House of Representative, Mr. Jide Jimoh, who stood in for the Minister of Information and Culture, Mr. Lai Muhammed.

 Member, Health Service Committee of the Nigeria’s House of Representative, Mr. Jide Jimoh throws banter with Fadesola at the Freedom Park, Ojota, Lagos. Photo credit: Luqmon Balogun.

Member, Health Service Committee of the Nigeria’s House of Representative, Mr. Jide Jimoh throws banter with Fadesola at the Freedom Park, Ojota, Lagos. Photo credit: Luqmon Balogun.

Motive of race
“I embarked on the fund raising marathon in honour of my late elder brother, Adeyosola, who died from complications arising from Steven-Johnson’s Syndrome and also to increase awareness and raise fund for the disease. Adeyosola contracted the disease after an allergic reaction to a precautionary medication he took while heading a team of foreign-based doctors caring for HIV patients in Lagos at the time,” Adedayo said.

Late Adeyosola, a University of Birmingham-trained medical doctor, died on March 20, 2012.

Steven-Johnson’s Syndrome
According to a doctor, Pamel Anderson, who was also part of the contingent that welcomed the famous trekker to Lagos, explains that,  “Steven-Johnson syndrome is a rare, serious disorder of your skin and mucous membranes. It’s usually a reaction to a medication or an infection. Often, Steven-Johnson syndrome begins with flu-like syndrome, followed by a painful red or purplish rash that spreads and blisters.”

Anderson said that drugs that could cause Steven-Johnson syndrome include:

  • Anti-gout medication, such as allopurinol
  • Pain relievers such as acetaminophen ibuprofen
  • Medication to fight infection, such as penicillin
  • Medication to treat seizures or mental illness
  • Radiation therapy

Gains of race
Adedayo continued, “What i want to gain from the marathon is for people to be more exposed about the disease so that people don’t have to go through the pain that my brother went through, as well as bring general light to the health conditions in Nigeria.”

Self medication
Adedayo advised people to eschew the act of self medication which is the basis of the syndrome.

“What i want people to do is to be more careful before taking any drug. They should ensure to see a doctor or pharmacist, so as to be aware of the potential side effect of the drugs before it is used.”

While receiving Adedayo at the Freedom Park, Ojota, Mr Jimoh said the race would create more awareness about the health status of the people and push for more legislation by lawmakers to review the health sector.

He, however, enjoined the youth to shun violence and involve in activities that could develop the nation.

 

Sammie