Nigeria’s Cultural Economy Flourishes On Global Stage

Hikmat Bamigboye, Abuja

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The month of February has seen unprecedented levels of recognition on the global stage for Nigeria’s creative arts.

On February 3, four Nigerian artistes – Burna Boy, ASAKE, Davido and Ayra Star – were nominated at The Grammys, the international music industry’s most prestigious awards event.

Last Sunday, the NFL Super Bowl featured an inspiring commercial titled “Everyone Has a Role to Play” directed by Nigerian photographer and filmmaker Andrew Dosunmu. The TV advertisement was rapturously received by viewers all over the world.

This weekend, the focus shifts to the animation sector, Renowned illustrator and Director Shofela Coker has been nominated on three categories at the industry-leading Annie Awards in Los Angeles.
This is the first time that a Nigerian has been nominated, and Coker is the first African to receive three nominations.

Nigeria’s Minister of Arts, Culture and Creative Economy, Hannatu Musawa, attended the Grammys in Los Angeles to show support for Nigeria’s nominated artists, who have excelled in in capturing the attention of music fans worldwide.

During her trip, the Minister met with leading industry figures at music’s biggest annual get-together, to explore ways in which Nigeria can build greater pathways for young talent to reach their global potential and improve opportunities at home.

As part of President Bola Tinubu’s economic diversification strategy, Musawa is reaching out to the international arts industry to find avenues for greater collaboration, and set the tone for future cooperation and inward investment.

The Ministry’s strategy is reflective of the fact that the nation’s burgeoning arts scene is gaining in popularity the world over, with Nigerian music, film, fashion and visual arts at the vanguard of an increasingly globalised sector.

African art and culture is surging in popularity, and Nigeria is riding the crest of a wave with its unique art forms, which the whole world is truly embracing,” Musawa said.

“Our artistic community forms an integral part of our cultural economy, which we are aiming to significantly expand in the coming years as part of the nation’s drive to attract investment and facilitate greater opportunities for Nigeria’s creative classes, she added.