Various Leaders Cast Ballots In The Highly Contested Vote

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South Africans began voting Wednesday at schools, community centers and in large white tents set up in open fields in an election seen as their country’s most important in 30 years.

It could put the young democracy in unknown territory.

 

President Cyril Ramaphosa cast his vote alongside his wife, Tshepo Motsepe in the Johannesburg township of Soweto.

At stake is the three-decade dominance of the African National Congress party, which led South Africa out of apartheid’s brutal white minority rule in 1994.

 

It is now the target of a new generation of discontent in a country of 62 million people — half of whom are estimated to be living in poverty.

Africa’s most advanced economy has some of the world’s deepest socioeconomic problems, including one of the worst unemployment rates at 32%.

 

The lingering inequality, with poverty and joblessness disproportionately affecting the Black majority, threatens to unseat the party that promised to end it by bringing down apartheid under the slogan of a better life for all.

After winning six successive national elections, several polls have the ANC’s support at less than 50% ahead of this one, an unprecedented drop.

 

It might lose its majority in Parliament for the first time, although it’s widely expected to hold the most seats.

Ramaphosa, the leader of the ANC, has promised to “do better.” The ANC has asked for more time and patience.

 

Opposition the DA voting

The leader of the Democratic Alliance cast his vote in Durban on Wednesday in South Africa’s election seen as their country’s most important in 30 years.

At stake is the three-decade dominance of the African National Congress party, which led South Africa out of apartheid’s brutal white minority rule in 1994. It is now the target of a new generation of discontent in a country of 62 million people — half of whom are estimated to be living in poverty.

Africa’s most advanced economy has some of the world’s deepest socioeconomic problems, including one of the worst unemployment rates at 32%.

 

The lingering inequality, with poverty and joblessness disproportionately affecting the Black majority, threatens to unseat the party that promised to end it by bringing down apartheid under the slogan of a better life for all.

 

Leader of one of the main opposition parties John Steenhuisen cast his vote in Durban.

The Democratic Alliance is part of an agreement with other smaller parties to combine their vote in an effort to remove the ruling ANC completely, but that’s not seen as likely.

 

Zuma voting

Former South African President Jacob Zuma cast his vote on Wednesday in an election seen as the country’s most important in 30 years and one that could put their young democracy in unknown territory.

Disgruntled South Africans are moving to an array of opposition parties; more than 50 will contest the national election, many of them new.

 

One is led by Zuma, who has turned against his former ANC allies.

Zuma was disqualified from standing as a candidate for Parliament but his MK Party is still contesting and is the wild card.

At stake Wednesday is the three-decade dominance of the African National Congress party.

 

It led South Africa out of apartheid’s brutal white minority rule in 1994 but is now the target of a new generation of discontent in a country of 62 million people.

 

The ANC says it is confident of retaining its majority and analysts have not ruled that out, given the party’s decades of experience in government and its unmatched grassroots campaigning machine.

It still has wide support, especially among older voters and those in more rural areas.

Final results are expected by Sunday.

 

African news/Jide Johnson.

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